angelfunding

European Business Angels Heading to Dublin

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April 15, 2014

Ireland is carving out a strong reputation for itself as one of Europe’s hottest nations when it comes to technology, and many Irish based businesses and entrepreneurs have attracted a lot of investment in recent months.

 

It is perhaps fitting that Dublin, Ireland’s capital city, finds itself as the destination for this year’s Eban Congress on 13 – 14 May, the continent’s largest annual gathering of business angels.

 

The Eban Congress aims to fulfil a number of objectives, and brings together venture capital (VC) and private equity (PE) funds alongside the business angels in order to discuss the landscape for angel investing across Europe and to share their experiences.

 

Research conducted by Eban and reported on businessandleadership.com indicated that the funds invested by angel investors across Europe is still growing. The most recent information available is for 2012, which showed growth of 19% year-on-year to a total figure of €5.1billion.

 

As an indicator of how well Ireland itself is performing, the nation saw angel investment totalling €8million in 2013, which was placed into 50 businesses at the early stage. There was a further €18million raised through other private channels, which also went into businesses across the country.

 

While these figures are promising, Michael Culligan of the Halo Business Angel Network told the Business and Leadership website, “It is worth noting that these figures only represent the visible or formal business angel marketplace. International research shows that the total business angel marketplace can be an estimated eight to nine times greater than the formal market.”

 

There is no doubt that this upcoming event represents a major opportunity for businesses in Ireland to highlight what they can offer both the angel investment community as well as the wider PE and VC marketplaces. Hosting this event should enable Ireland to further establish itself as a hot PE hub in the coming months and years, especially if it can continue capitalising on lucrative industry areas like technology.

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